Need A False Passport, Driving License Or ID Card? Part 4: The Interpol And Operation Onymousous

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On March 4, 2018, Posted by , In Uncategorized, With Comments Off on Need A False Passport, Driving License Or ID Card? Part 4: The Interpol And Operation Onymousous

Hook

Governments also dislike the dark web because its nature implies that they have no control over the user. The NSA and the British with their GCHQ (the men who hacked Belgacom and quit full of malware) have already tried to get a grip on the dark web, but the result is poor.

Shadowcat

The British have something called SHADOWCAT, which should be able to decipher “end-to-end encrypted access to VPS over SSH using the TOR network”, but its presentation, which was leaked into the files that Edward Snowden revealed, says that it is not working really well. The reason is simple: if you use enough encryption, they won’t get through it.

Operation Onymousous

Onymous operations involved taking down hundreds of illegal sites offline on the dark web. It was a drop in the ocean as turned out afterwards.”

In November last year, there was the internationally coordinated operation Onymous, Silk Road 2.0 being rolled up, an illegal, black marketplace where you could buy everything from weapons to drugs. At Onymous,”hundreds” of illegal sites were taken offline on the dark web.

Europol and the FBI were euphoric: “Today we have demonstrated that, together, we are able to efficiently remove vital criminal infrastructures that are supporting serious organized crime. And we are not just removing these services from the open Internet; this time we have also hit services on the darknet using Tor where, for a long time, criminals have considered themselves beyond reach. We can now show that they are neither invisible nor untouchable. The criminals can run but they can’t hide”.

The truth is that Onymous was a gigantic fart in a bottle. The operation, which took place in 16 countries at the same time, took barely a million euros in bitcoin and 180,000 euros in cash, counterfeit items, drugs and weapons. It’s peanuts comparing to what goes around on the dark web. Most of the 410 sites dismantled did not even appear to be doing illegal things, or just fake. And those who weren’t, just resurfaced a few days later. Agora, already much larger than Silk Road, just stayed up. There is also the fact that the dark web is much more than just onion sites. And that it consists largely of ghost markets, which suddenly appear and then disappear.

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